Windsor’s Lumberjack restaurant warns of fraudulent job postings

Breadcrumb Trail links

Scammers have been using the names of Windsor businesses — such as The Lumberjack restaurant — to trick job seekers out of their money.

The exterior of The Lumberjack restaurant at 475 Tecumseh Rd. East is shown in this 2015 file photo. The exterior of The Lumberjack restaurant at 475 Tecumseh Rd. East is shown in this 2015 file photo. Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

Article content

Scammers have been using the names of local businesses — such as The Lumberjack restaurant — to trick job seekers out of their money.

Advertisement 2

This advertisement has not been loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

The popular family eatery at 475 Tecumseh Rd. East took to social media earlier this week to inform the public that ads posted on the website Indeed.com for server and cashier jobs at The Lumberjack were not placed by management.

“Although the ad has now been removed, it was published for six days before being brought to our attention,” The Lumberjack’s management wrote.

By clicking on the sign up button you consent to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You may unsubscribe any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails or any newsletter. Postmedia Network Inc | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300

Article content

“Beware! This is not The Lumberjack restaurant. We don’t list jobs on Indeed.”

Windsor police were notified about the false postings.

According to the investigators with the Financial Crimes Branch, the postings were part of a known scheme in which fraudsters pose as legitimate companies offering job opportunities.

Unsuspecting job seekers contact the scammers thinking they are communicating with a potential employer.

Advertisement 3

This advertisement has not been loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

The scammers convince the victims that they are being hired. Checks are sent to the victims under the pretense of wages.

The victims are told to deposit the cheques. Then they are directed to send a portion of the funds back — due to fabricated reasons such as equipment or software costs, service costs, or “overpayment.”

Once the victims send their own money to the scammers, the checks that were deposited bounce and the victims are left at a loss.

“Legitimate companies do not generally ask for any money to be sent or send money prior to any work being completed,” Windsor police advised. “If it seems too good to be true, then it probably is too good to be true.”

Members of the Financial Crimes Branch remind the public to always be cautious about sharing personal information, whether online, via phone, or in person.

[email protected]

  1. The badge of the Windsor Police Service in 2017.

    Toronto trio faces charges in alleged attempt to defraud Windsor car dealer

  2. Logo of Royal Canadian Mounted Police outside division headquarters in Surrey, BC, in April 2018.

    RCMP: Windsor man with history of fraud charged in identity theft scheme

  3. The Cam Clark Ford dealership in Airdrie, Alberta, is shown in this May 2017 Google Maps image.

    Woman with Windsor ties faces 17 fraud-related charges in Alberta

Share this article on your social network

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encouraging all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

Comments are closed.